Temporarily on pause until June 2019

reading32pages.comI am going to have to temporarily pause my brief picture book reviews until June 2019 when I can start back up again doing what I love –reading and talking about picture books.

I will still maintain my Facebook and Twitter accounts in which I will share current library, book, and reading related news and humor.

Thank you so much for following me.  See you in the summer of 2019!!!

Thank You, Earth: A Love Letter to Our Planet by April Pulley Sayre

Thank you, EarthThank You, Earth: A Love Letter to Our Planet by April Pulley Sayre; illustrated by April Pulley Sayre. 2018. Photography. Published by Greenwillow Books.

Brief summary: This beautiful rhyming love letter thanking the earth of all its wonderful life and land is illustrated with superb nature photos capturing the awesomeness of the planet.

Comments: This book could be shared at Thanksgiving with a discussion of what each child is thankful for that the earth gives us.  It could also be shared on Earth Day. Topnotch photography as in her other books Raindrops Roll, Best in Snow, and Fall of Fall.

There is  A Note From the Author in back.

Square by Mac Barnett

SquareSquare by Mac Barnett; illustrated by Jon Klassen; 2018. Digitally and with watercolor and graphite. Published by Candlewick Press.

Brief summary: Square goes into his secret den every day and pushes out a square of rock and piles it with the other squares. One day Circle rolls by and compliments Square for his wonderful sculpture that looks like the artist. Could Square sculpture one of Circle? He works all night in the rain. Will Circle be pleased with his results?

Comments: Second of the shape trilogy of Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen.  Young readers will be amused by the sense of humor in Square as they were in Triangle. The illustrations are blacks, grays, and browns.

A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women’s Rights by Kate Hannigan

aladyhasthefloorA Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women’s Rights by Kate Hannigan; illustrated by Alison Jay. 2018. Alkyd paint with crackle varnish.  Published by Calkins Creek.

Brief summary: Belva was already a teacher at age 14 and went to college in 1857 to learn more. She taught in New York encouraging and teaching girls how to speak publicly and for the girls to be able to have gym classes. She went to law school and completed her studies but was not given her diploma, because she was a woman. Belva wrote to the president of the school who later delivered it to her personally…Ulysses S. Grant who just happened to also be the President of the United States of America at the time. Belva was the first woman to have a law license. She fought for widows and Civil War veterans.  She was not allowed to argue her cases, because she was a woman. She was the first woman to run for President under the National Equal Rights Party.

Comments: I really did not know how many things a woman was not permitted to do until I read this book. Belva Lockwood had guts and was a determined women’s rights activist that I’d like to have more credit given to in the history books. I can just imagine how it felt to have men dress up in women’s clothing and making fun of her in the streets as she tried campaigning against Grover Cleveland. Thank you, Belva! Back pages:  Author’s note and Timeline

 

 

 

Between the Lines: How Ernie Barnes Went from the Football Field to the Art Gallery by Sandra Neil Wallace

BetweenthelinesBetween the Lines: How Ernie Barnes Went from the Football Field to the Art Gallery by Sandra Neil Wallace; illustrated by Bryan Collier. 2018. Watercolor and collage. Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary: It was the 1940s. Ernie Barnes really did not want to play football but was encouraged to make a living from it. He played for several teams. Although he was successful, his heart was not into it. He found himself drawing and painting all the time. He stopped playing football after a foot injury and was able to put his time into his art.

Comments: In the back of the book: Historical note, Author’s note, illustrator’s note, To Learn More, Quote Sources, additional resources. I recognized this style immediately from somewhere in my past but did not know the artist until after reading this book. His unique style of elongated figures caught the eye of many. His website: http://www.erniebarnes.com/

 

 

The Great Dictionary Caper by Judy Sierra

thegreatdictionarycaperThe Great Dictionary Caper by Judy Sierra; illustrated by Eric Comstock. 2018. Digital. Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary: Grand Marshall, I, tries to get everyone ready for a parade but has trouble with the longest word(see if you can guess what it is), action verbs, no action contractions, homophones, antonyms, palindrome, archaic words, proper nouns, anagrams, interjections, and others to get back into the dictionary with the help of Noah Webster(first dictionary) and Peter Mark Roget(thesaurus).

Comments: Glossary in the back. This actually will be better understood by the older young reader who can understand and is familiar with all the types of word categories. I would share this with third grade on up.

 

Chester Nez and the Unbreakable Code: A Navajo Code Talker’s Story by Joseph Bruchac

Chester Nez and the Unbreakable CodeChester Nez and the Unbreakable Code: A Navajo Code Talker’s Story by Joseph Bruchac; illustrated by Liz Amini-Holmes. 2018.

Brief summary: In 1929, a missionary truck took an eight-year-old Navajo boy from his family to go to a Catholic boarding school.  It wasn’t optional. He was stripped of his Navajo name and given his new English name of Chester by a missionary nun. His hair was cut and he was not allowed to speak his native tongue; only English. He was forced to become Catholic and told that his heritage was to be forgotten. During tenth grade, Chester joined the Marines in 1941 after the Pearl Harbor bombing. Platoon 382 consisted of 29 Navajos. These men created the famous Navajo code that the enemies could not decipher. Ironically, the language they were forbidden to speak saved the English speaking one.

Comments: The back consists of an Author’s note, The Navajo Code, and a timeline.  I’m glad to see more of these books being published lately on the subject of mandatory boarding school for Native American children and other atrocities that the Canadian and US government forced upon these indigenous people.

Joseph Bruchac (of the Abenaki Tribe) is one of my favorite Native American writers. Thanks to him, many of the Native American stories told through oral tradition are being put into print. Students love his monster lore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain by Cheryl Bardoe

Nothing Stopped SophieNothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain by Cheryl Bardoe; illustrated by Barbara McClintock. 2018. Pen-and-ink, watercolor, and collage. Published by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary: Sophie lived during the French Revolution in Paris.  During this turbulent time in history, Sophie was interested in math. Her family tried to get her to stop studying at night by taking away her candles, fires, and warm dresses to keep her in her bed and not calculating complex math problems.  By age 19, she wanted to go to a university to study math, but that was unheard of for a woman to do that. She was able to get notes from math classes and turned in assignments signing them “Monsieur LeBlanc”.  A professor came to her house and discovered she was the student. She met several scholars and was quietly becoming known. Her most famous math contribution was when she was able to find a mathematical formula that would predict vibration patterns. The Academy of Sciences had a math contest that had a prize of 3,000 francs. Sophie applied had the wrong solution. She kept testing and experimenting until 1826 when she found the answer to the problem and won.

Comments: Sections in the back are: short bio sketch, Is this Math or Science? Discover the Effects of Vibration for Yourself, Notes from the author and illustrator, and a bibliography.

(I have the comment moderation turned on. Your comment will appear after it has been approved. Keep in mind that young readers may be reading the picture book I reviewed so I will not approve your comment if there is inappropriate language. Be kind; be polite. No spam or ads, please. Because I am working as a library media specialist, it may take me a day to get back to my blog.

If you see that I made a typo or grammatical error, I’m totally cool with you politely letting me know. No need to be snarky. I am fully aware that I have an attention span of a hummingbird and miss things when I proofread. I also realize that I am not a professional writer, but I am willing to learn and improve)

Bloom: A Story of Fashion Designer Elsa Schiaparelli by Kyo Maclear

Bloom

Bloom: A Story of Fashion Designer Elsa Schiaparelli by Kyo Maclear; illustrated by Julie Morstad. 2018. Liquid watercolor, gouache, and pencil crayons. Published by HarperCollins.

Brief summary: Growing up in Italy, Elsa notices the brilliant colors of the flowers. She enjoys designing dresses and is influenced by the countries she visits. Back in Paris, she befriends other artists of the surrealistic art movement and begins to bloom at age 37 when she opens her first shop. She and a chemist, Jean Clement, create a bright pink in which she uses in her dress fabrics.

Comments: End pages are brilliant pink. Told in the first person narrative through Elsa’s voice. She was known as mixing fabrics not commonly done and often had clothing as art. Brief bio sketch in the back detailing some of the new clothing creations that are common today like see-through raincoats and colored tights. Book for the young artistic fashionista.

(I have the comment moderation turned on. Your comment will appear after it has been approved. Keep in mind that young readers may be reading the picture book I reviewed so I will not approve your comment if there is inappropriate language. Be kind; be polite. No spam or ads, please. Because I am working as a library media specialist, it may take me a day to get back to my blog.

If you see that I made a typo or grammatical error, I’m totally cool with you politely letting me know. No need to be snarky. I am fully aware that I have an attention span of a hummingbird and miss things when I proofread. I also realize that I am not a professional writer, but I am willing to learn and improve).

Joan Procter, Dragon Doctor : The Woman Who Loved Reptiles by Patricia Valdez

Joan Procter, Dragon DoctorJoan Procter, Dragon Doctor: The Woman Who Loved Reptiles by Patricia Valdez; illustrated by Felicita Sala. 2018. Published by Alfred A. Knopf.

Brief summary: Joan Procter did not have the usual tea parties with girlfriends and dolls; she had them with reptiles. She even took a crocodile to school. She was hired as the assistant to the curator of the London’s Natural History Museum and inherited the position after he retired. She designed the London Zoo’s Reptile House updating it to be more of the reptiles’ natural habitat. After receiving two Komodo dragons who arrived sick, she nursed them back to good health. They became a hit at the zoo in 1927 being the first live specimens to arrive in Europe. Ms. Procter was often seen with one of them named Sumbawa walking beside her as a pet as she did her strolls through the zoo.

Comments: Whoa! Walking with a komodo throughout the zoo?  I would love to have seen a photo of that in this book! Brief bio sketch in the back with a bibliography. I would share this with any young reptile lovers.

(I have the comment moderation turned on. Your comment will appear after it has been approved. Keep in mind that young readers may be reading the picture book I reviewed, so I will not approve your comment if there is inappropriate language. Be kind; be polite. No spam or ads, please. Because I am working as a library media specialist, it may take me a day to get back to my blog.

If you see that I made a typo or grammatical error, I’m totally cool with you politely letting me know. No need to be snarky. I am fully aware that I have an attention span of a hummingbird and miss things when I proofread. I also realize that I am not a professional writer, but I am willing to learn and improve).

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