Rectangle Time by Pamela Paul

Rectangle Time by Pamela Paul; illustrated by Becky Cameron. 2021. Published by Philomel Books.

Brief summary: A thoughtful cat enjoys rectangle time with his boy and father and helps in any way he can to make it superb. He always sits in someone’s lap and scratches his face on the rectangle. Soon, he notices that there are two voices at rectangle time and decides to add his. As time goes by, he hears that rectangle time is now silent and only with the boy. The cat decides he will break the quietness.

Years pass. The cat sees how rectangle time is now with two again, but they are sitting in silence at opposite sides of the room. The cat pokes the boy to let him know he is still contributing with this special ritual. The cat believes it is an accident when the boy removes his helpful paw.

More time passes and the cat concludes the boy is not enjoying his rectangle time by himself on his bed, so the supportive cat sits on the rectangle. He gets dumped on the floor and realizes it was not an accident. The caring cat decides to re-position himself. Will this persistent feline ever find the right way again to share rectangle time?

Comments: Whenever we have story time in elementary school, we call it “circle time” when the children would gather around in sort of a circle and listen/participate with a read aloud. “Rectangle time” is such a cute name showing that story time is through the cat’s perspective and how it changes over the years as the boy grows older.

Definitely a good choice for library media specialists and teachers to share.

I Talk Like a River by Jordan Scott

I Talk Like a River by Jordan Scoot; illustrated by Sydney Smith. 2020. Watercolor, ink and gouache. Published by Neal Porter Books.

Brief summary: A young boy wakes up and notices all of the words around him as he gets ready to go to school where he does not have a good day. His father picks him up after school noticing that his son is having a bad speech day. He takes the boy to the river where they walk in silence along the bank. His father hugs him and says, “See how that water moves? That’s how you speak.”

The boy looks at the river and sees how the water in the river goes slowly, quickly, bubbling, and in many other ways. He realizes how the river can go smoothly at times and also choppy just like how he sometimes speaks. He is able to understand the stuttering simile and goes to school the next day sharing with the class about his favorite place in the world…the river.

Comments: Speech teachers! Here is a superb book for you to share with a student who stutters. Lovely simile that could help students understand how they speak as well as their classmates’.

Touching explanation in the back from the author sharing his stuttering speech as a child and how he wrote this book based on his own life.

Join author Jordan Scott and illustrator Sydney Smith as they discuss their new picture book, ‘I Talk Like a River”.

What’s Inside a Flower?: And Other Questions About Science and Nature by Rachel Ignotofsky

What’s Inside a Flower?: And Other Questions About Science & Nature by Rachel Ignotofsky; illustrated by Rachel Ignotofsky. 2021. Illustrations are created traditionally and with a computer. Published by Crown Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary: Questions about flowers are answered with beautiful illustrations and clear informative text. The many labeled diagrams, dialog bubbles, and mixture of fonts and sizes make the picture book easy to read and understand. Young readers will learn about the flower’s seed, root, and blossom.

Comments: This is a nonfiction picture book fully illustrated from the top to the bottom of the page. The end pages are decorated with a variety of flowers. There is a “Sources” page in the back.

This is the launch of a new nonfiction picture book series. You may recognize Ignotofsky’s unique style in her Women in Series Collection.

A Special Story Time: Rachel Ignotofsky presents “What’s Inside a Flower” with VromansBookst

Peter Easter Frog by Erin Dealey

Peter Easter Frog by Erin Dealey; illustrated by G. Brian Karas. 2021. Mixed media. Published by Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books.

Brief summary: Peter Easter Frog hops along the forest’s trail placing colored eggs in the grass and runs into a turtle with her Easter hat on. He invites her along his journey and comes across a cow. She joins the frog and turtle as they pass out more eggs and collect a dog and chipmunk to join them. They come across the Easter Bunny who is not happy with them doing his job. Peter Easter Frog gives the Easter Bunny an egg; the first time anyone ever gave the rabbit one. He decides they could all help him deliver the colored eggs.

Comments: This is sweet book with nice pastel illustrations.

This book reminds me of the Easter song we sang in elementary school (“Here Comes Peter Cottontail”) probably because the first line in the book and in the song are very similar. Here is one version of the song:

Here Comes Peter Cottontail | Easter Song for Kids | Bunny Song | The Kiboomers

How to Catch a Clover Thief by Elise Parsley

How to Catch a Clover Thief by Elise Parsley; illustrated by Elise Parsley. 2021. Digitally drawn, painted in Adobe Photoshop. Published by  Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary: A wild boar named Roy is waiting for his clover patch to bloom. He warns his gopher neighbor, Jarvis, to not steal his clover. Jarvis assures him that he would never steal the yummy white blossoms and gives Roy a clover recipe book to read while the boar waits. Roy decides to go out and get some of the ingredients for a recipe and discovers upon his return that his clover patch is smaller.

Jarvis visits Roy the next day and asks what is the matter. Roy points out that there is a clover thief! Roy explains that he needs to stand guard of his clover and tells the gopher to go away. The gopher offers him a campsite book to help Roy stay there and guard. The wild boar reads the book and starts to put up a tent and build a campfire only to discover that his clover patch is smaller again.

Jarvis continues to give Roy various books while the clover patch gets smaller and smaller. Roy decides he is going to the library to get a book to figure out how to catch the clover thief. Will his invention work?

Comments: Young readers will enjoy the secret and mystery of who is the clover thief. Laugh out loud fun!

I like how the character reads to find answers and eventually, goes to the library to find the perfect book to catch the thief.

“Best-selling author-illustrator Elise Parsley presents her new hilarious new picture book, HOW TO CATCH A CLOVER THIEF.”

Eyes That Kiss in the Corners by Joanna Ho

Eyes That Kiss in the Corners by Joanna Ho; illustrated by Dung Ho. 2021. Digitally illustrated(Adobe Photoshop). Published by HarperCollins.

Brief summary: A young girl notices the different type of eyes she and her group of friends have and is aware that hers “kiss in the corners and glow like warm tea”. Her Asian eyes are like her mother’s as they laugh together. The girl then notices that her Amah’s eyes are like hers and just like her mother’s. The girl knows her Amah’s eyes when she tells stories of long ago. Mei-Mei, her younger sister, has eyes just like they do. She notices her little sister’s eyes when they play.

The young girl realizes that her eyes are like her ancestors’ and now.

Comments: The young girl experiences self awareness of her eyes and her family’s.

Beautiful yellow flowers on the end pages. Large bright illustrations. Beautiful.

The metaphor of her eyes kissing in the corners is ssssoooo precious!


Eyes That Kiss in the Corners Book Trailer by HarperCollins Studio

And the People Stayed Home by Kitty O’Meara

And the People Stayed Home by Kitty O’Meara; illustrated by Stefano Di Cristofaro and Paul Pereda. 2020. Published by Tra Publishing.

Brief summary: Kitty O’ Meara’s poem shares what might happen during the COVID-19 pandemic and after it. The poem begins with, “And the people stayed home.” and continues showing what various people would do during the quarantine such as enjoying music, art, and reading. They stop and listen to others more and get to know their families. The poet predicts what will happen once the pandemic is over.

Comments: This is a sweet and innocent poem that could be shared with young readers. The illustrations are large and bright. Although they were created by two illustrators, there is not a division of style.

This poem came out during the beginning of the pandemic with a wishful hope of how humans will behave and learn from this disease. So, there is none of the negativity of some of the things that did happen.

I am looking forward to more picture books being published about the pandemic in the months to come including some about those individuals/groups who did not get to stay home.

There is a brief Q & A of the poet in the back of the book. There is a website also with more information about Kitty O’ Meara including a teacher’s guide for the poem– https://andthepeoplestayedhomebook.com/

Book Trailer: And the People Stayed Home – by Kitty O’Meara – read by Kate Winslet

Moose, Goose, and Mouse by Mordicai Gerstein

Moose, Goose, and Mouse by Mordicai Gerstein; illustrated by Jeff Mack. 2021 Ink, pencil and watercolor on paper and digital collage. Published by Holiday House.

Brief summary: Moose, Goose, and Mouse live in a wet, old, and cold house with mold. They take a train to look for a nicer home. They are in the caboose when it becomes loose going backwards up and down hills. It derails and crashes into a large palm tree by the sea. Will they find a new house?

Summary: Beautiful and heartfelt story in the back page of how this book was created. Jeff Mack and Mordicai met with four other author friends every month for about ten years to talk about their books. Jeff and Mordicai develop a work relationship. And, I’ll stop there, so I do not spoil how and why the book was created.

Rhyming book. Fun and hilarious read aloud for little ones.

My Creepy Valentine by Arthur Howard

My Creepy Valentine by Arthur Howard; illustrated by Arthur Howard. Oct. 2020. Mixed media. Published by Beach Lane Books.

Brief summary: Mitzi loves all of the holidays except Valentine’s Day. Witches like creepy stuff while Valentine’s Day is lovey. She has never made a valentine until she meets Spencer who can spurt milk out of his nose during lunch and wiggle his ears while hanging upside down at recess. Mitzi tries coming up with a perfect poem to give to him. She and her cat, Hoodwink, jump on her broom and secretly deliver it. Spencer does not respond the next day which causes her to be depressed. Will she cheer up? Will she ever receive a Valentine?

Comments: Cute story of finding someone who likes you just as much as you like them.