Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer by Diane Stanley

Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer by Diane Stanley

Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer by Diane Stanley; illustrated by Jessie Hartland. 2016. Gouache.

Brief summary: Ada Lovelace, daughter of Lord Byron and math whiz Annabella, did not like the things and interests of other young women of her time. She co-worked with Charles Babbage to invent the Analytical Engine which could run any mathematical calculation by using punched cards and considered the first programmable all-purpose digital computer. Ada wrote the mathematical code. Ada wrote a scientific paper about the invention giving it scientific and mathematical attention. She translated the work from French to English.

Comments: Back pages explain  how  both scientists worked on the engine, but there was some concern of what each contributed.  Good addition for a coding study.

(I may get a commission for purchases made through links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books reviewed were checked out of the public library and not sent to me free for review).

Best in Snow by April Pulley Sayre

Best in Snow by April Pulley Sayre

Best in Snow by April Pulley Sayre; illustrated by April Pulley Sayre. 2016. Photography.

Brief summary: Superb photos of snow in nature with all its forms and shapes. Begins with snow on a squirrel’s nose and then explores how snow looks and forms in the forest with snow in its full water cycle and then ending on a squirrel’s nose again.

Comments: Very well done. You really need to see it to appreciate the beauty of this book. I can’t imagine the patience it took to get all of these high end photos of the various forms of snow and in the forest. I nominate this as the number one winter book this year. I would suggest pairing it with her companion that came out last year, Raindrops Roll. I can’t wait to see what she creates next.

raindropsroll

(I may get a commission for purchases made through links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books reviewed were checked out of the public library and not sent to me free for review).

Around America to Win the Vote: Two Suffragists, a Kitten, and 10,000 Miles by Mara Rockliff

Around America to Win the Vote: Two Suffragists, a Kitten, and 10,000 Miles by Mara Rockliff

Around America to Win the Vote: Two Suffragists, a Kitten, and 10,000 Miles by Mara Rockliff; illustrated by Hadley Hooper. 2016. “Pencil printmaking techniques then scanned and completed digitally.”

Brief summary: In 1916,  Nell Richardson and Alice Burke travel across America beginning in New York City traveling in a yellow car with a black kitten wearing a yellow ribbon. Roads in America at that time were more like dirt paths and without maps. They gave many speeches urging and encouraging that women had a right to vote. Sometimes they were well received, and sometimes not.

Comments: In the back of the book, there is an information page about the cross country car trip, an explanation of the color yellow, and a further reading section.  This could be shared around election time to help students understand the history women endured to just have the right to vote. It could inspire young girls to not take for granted this right and encourage them to give thanks to suffragists brave enough to fight for them.

Elizabeth Started All the Trouble by Doreen Rappaport

Elizabeth Started All the Trouble by Doreen Rappaport

Elizabeth Started All the Trouble by Doreen Rappaport; illustrated by Matt Faulkner. 2016.

Brief summary: This narrative nonfiction begins the women suffragists’ history with Abigail Adams urging her husband not to forget about the rights of the women when he and other men were drafting the Declaration of Independence and features other suffragists, women activists and women social reformers over the decades.

Comments: Sections in the back of the book include:  trailblazer biographies of some of the most famous women, important dates, selected research sources, websites, and author’s notes. This book could be used with intermediate, middle, and h.s. students for units of voting, women’s rights, and equality.

Brave Like Me by Barbara Kerley

Brave Like Me by Barbara Kerley

Brave Like Me by Barbara Kerley; illustrated by National Geographic. 2016. Photography.

Brief summary: This book depicts a variety of parents in different military branches saying good-bye to their children before deployment.  It talks about how the children and soldiers cope with the worry and frustration of this separation. It encourages being brave and strong.

Comments: A narrative nonfiction. The large photos throughout include diversity of military branches, ethnic backgrounds, and female/male soldiers.  I like how this was a very real book about employment and  talks about the anxiety of separation for the children as well as the parents including  how to cope in the days to follow. These are actual families and includes a world map to show where the soldiers were stationed.  In the back of the book, there is a  section on separation  along with what brave means, who serves, a note to caregivers, and further resources sections. I’d like to see more patriotic books like this one. I plan to share this book with my students before Veterans’ Day.

 

Anything but Ordinary Addie: The True Story of Adelaide Herrman, Queen of Magic by Mara Rockliff

Anything but Ordinary Addie: The True Story of Adelaide Herrman, Queen of Magic by Mara Rockliff

Anything but Ordinary Addie: The True Story of Adelaide Herrman, Queen of Magic by Mara Rockliff; illustrated by Iacopo Bruno. 2016. Pencil and digitally colored.

Brief Summary: Spunky Adelaide meets her future husband while taking a ship to America and shortly becomes Adelaide Herman. She assists her husband in his magic shows until he dies. She decides to continue the show by becoming Adelaide Hermann: The Queen of Magic, one of the first women magicians.

Comments: This is a narrative nonfiction/biography with a brief bio timeline in the back. No glossary.

Whoosh!: Lonnie Johnson’s Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions by Chris Barton

Whoosh!: Lonnie Johnson's Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions by Chris Barton

Whoosh!: Lonnie Johnson’s Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions by Chris Barton; illustrated by Don Tate. Illustrations created digitally. 2016.

Brief Summary: Lonnie Johnson was one of six children living in Mobile, Alabama. He was interested in inventing as a child leaving home to go to Tuskegee Institute to become an engineer. He invented the super-soaker realizing that an air pump would make the water go further. He went to a toy company and his water gun was produced making water fighting more fun than ever.

Comments: This is an invention that students can relate to and will want to know who and how it was created.  Nonfiction narrative.  It could go in biographies or inventions section of the library. I plan to share this during the first two weeks of school when students are still water fighting to cool off during the hot, August heat.

Solving the Puzzle Under the Sea: Marie Tharp Maps the Ocean Floor by Robert Burleigh

Solving the Puzzle Under the Sea: Marie Tharp Maps the Ocean Floor by Robert Burleigh

Solving the Puzzle Under the Sea: Marie Tharp Maps the Ocean Floor by Robert Burleigh; illustrated by Raul Colon. 2016. Watercolors, prismacolor pencils and lithograph pencils

Brief Summary: Told in first person at times rather than the usually third person. Marie Tharp’s father was a map maker and traveled with his family around the United States.  This is what inspired her.  She went to school but had a hard time getting a job where her colleagues took her seriously as a female map maker.  She wondered what the ocean looked like under the water and if it could be mapped. Scientists were starting to use “sounding” which is when a ship sends sound waves to the bottom of the sea and waits for it to return. This would tell them how deep the water was in that area. Ms. Tharp made a huge graph using these soundings and was able to make a map of the mountains and valleys of the ocean’s floor.  She discovered the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Photo of her in the back of the book. Included a glossary, other books to read, and internet links.

Comment: This narrative nonfiction/biography could be placed in the map area of nonfiction or biography area.  I think it will circulate more in my school library in the mapping area as teachers are always asking for map book collections to go with their units.  I think students will be surprised of how the ocean is mapped and the method used.  I will use this in my “Did you know?” book teaser talks.