The Bat Can Bat: A Book of True Homonyms by Gene Barretta

The Bat Can Bat

The Bat Can Bat: A Book of True Homonyms by Gene Barretta; illustrated by Gene Barretta. 2018. Published by Henry Holt and Company.

Brief summary: The animals enjoy playing sports and now the president has announced a law stating that animals have the right to play sports. The sport events are often with humorous human and animal combinations along with wordplay that makes the reader stop and think about what the homonym meaning is meant.

Comments: Fun story to teach young readers about words that are spelled and sounded the same but have two different meanings. Narrative nonfiction if shelved in the figurative language section. Could be shelved in the everybody section as well.

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Winter Dance by Marion Dane Bauer

Winter Dance

Winter Dance by Marion Dane Bauer; illustrated by Richard Jones. 2017.Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Brief summary: A beautiful fox sees that winter is coming and asks the forest animals what to do. He learns that the woolly caterpillar will wrap itself in a chrysalis. The turtle tells him to bury himself in the mud. The fox continues asking the forest animals and realizes that he cannot do what they do. He comes across another fox as the snow begins to fall and learns what foxes do.

Comments: This is a beautiful, softly illustrated story that explains how the forest prepares for winter. This is a great addition for those season book collections teachers request.

Can an Aardvark Bark? by Melissa Stewart

Can an Aardvark Bark

Can an Aardvark Bark? by Melissa Stewart; illustrated by Steve Jenkins. 2017. Cut and torn paper collage. Published by Beach Lane Books.

Brief Summary: Readers explore the sounds many animals make and why.

Comments: Most animal books identify animals by categories like reptiles, mammals, birds and so forth. Sometime the animals are identified by habitats like pond, farm, forest and so forth  This books identifies animals by the sounds they make.  I remember as a girl growing up in the country of first learning about some of the animals by sound.  I heard them first like the screech owl, cricket, frog and so forth.  This was a refreshing way to teach animals first by the sounds they make.  I’d love to see this as an audio-book with the various animals sounds included.

Buy here.

Dog on a Frog? by Kes and Claire Gray

Dog on a Frog?

Dog on a Frog? by Kes and Claire Gray; illustrated by Jim Field. 2017. Published by Scholastic Press.

Brief summary: A feisty and bossy frog speaks up and no longer wants dogs to sit on frogs. Dogs will now sit on logs. He tells everyone that they are now going to be sitting on other things that are not the norm anymore and tells them if they do not like it, they will just have to do it.

Comments: Sequel to Frog on a Log?. Silly and funny rhyming pairs. I plan to share this with my kindergartners and first graders for rhyming text fun.

Buy here.

Hello Goodbye Dog by Maria Gianferrari

Hello Goodbye Dog

Hello Goodbye Dog by Maria Gianferrari; illustrated by Patrice Barton. 2017. Published by Roaring Brook Press.

Brief summary: Zara loves her dog, Moose. Moose misses Zara when she goes to school. The dog wants to be with her owner and escapes from the house to be with Zara in her classroom. The dog loves the hellos of seeing Zara, but not the goodbyes when she must leave her human. It takes Mom, Dad, Zara and Mrs. Perkins to get Moose to leave the classroom. Moose soon returns for a big hello as everyone is reading in the library. The entire day is full of hellos and goodbyes for Moose. Zara comes up with a solution, and she and Moose go to therapy dog school where Moose passes all the tests to becomes Zara’s therapy dog. Now, Moose can attend school with Zara all day.

Comments: This is set up as a cumulative story with more and more people taking Moose out of the school. There is an author’s note in the back about library dogs and therapy dogs.  It was refreshing to read a story about a little girl who went to school and who happened to be in a wheelchair.  The story was not focused on her disability.

Buy here. 

(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library).

Different? Same! by Heather Tekavec

Different?Same!

Different? Same! by Heather Tekavec; illustrated by Pippa Curnick. 2017. Digitally rendered. Published by Kids Can Press.

Brief summary: Readers go through the two spread illustrations noticing what is different and what is surprisingly alike with the animals. What is different is immediately noticed. What do they have in common?  That is the surprise.

Comments: Very cleverly done. Animals that are usually not thought to have anything in common are shown that they do actually have something in common. A great way to broaden one’s mind by looking at animal characteristics in a new way. Each animal is labeled and a characteristic shared. The last sentence reveals the similarity they share. The back pages have a list of the different characteristics explained.

Buy here.

(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library).

Don’t Blink! by Tom Booth

Don't blink!

Don’t Blink! by Tom Booth; illustrated by Tom Booth. 2017. Illustrations are a combination of traditional and digital techniques. Published by Feiwel and Friends.

Brief summary: A little girl sitting criss-cross applesauce on the left side of the opened book stares at the reader while several animals come along asking her what is it that she is doing. They all join in with the staring contest being very careful not to blink.

Comments: A cute and fun read for young readers who will then want to have a staring contest with the closest person near them.

Buy here.

(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library).

A Perfect Day by Lane Smith

aperfectday

A Perfect Day by Lane Smith; illustrated by Lane Smith. 2017. Mixed media. Published by Roaring Brook Press.

Brief summary: It’s a warm sunny day in Bert’s back yard. A perfect day for cat, dog, Chickadee, Squirrel, and Bear but all in different ways. Bear is unaware of spoiling the other animals’ perfect day as he relaxes in Bert’s back yard.

Comments: It will get readers to stop and think what a perfect day means to them. A turn-and-share with students could teach about others’ interpretations.

Buy here.

(I may get a commission for purchases made through links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books reviewed were checked out of the public library and not sent to me free for review).

A Hungry Lion or a Dwindling Assortment of Animals by Lucy Ruth Cummins

A Hungry Lion or a Dwindling Assortment of Animals by Lucy Ruth Cummins   A Hungry Lion or a Dwindling Assortment of Animals by Lucy Ruth Cummins; illustrated by Lucy Ruth Cummins. 2016. Brush marker, gouache, graphite, colored pencil and charcoal

Brief Summery: A child assumes the lion has been eating the creatures as they slowly disappear from the story, but all along, they all have been preparing to throw the beast a surprise party. The lights go out, and he does eat them. The lights come on, and there is a T-Rex standing there who eats the lion. The turtle survives it all by pretending to be a rock.  The ending suggests another story with a little turtle eating a large cake.

Comment:  I plan to use this book when I talk about about story predictions. There are several times in the book that I could stop and ask the students if they could predict what would happen next in the book.