Dog on a Frog? by Kes and Claire Gray

Dog on a Frog?

Dog on a Frog? by Kes and Claire Gray; illustrated by Jim Field. 2017. Published by Scholastic Press.

Brief summary: A feisty and bossy frog speaks up and no longer wants dogs to sit on frogs. Dogs will now sit on logs. He tells everyone that they are now going to be sitting on other things that are not the norm anymore and tells them if they do not like it, they will just have to do it.

Comments: Sequel to Frog on a Log?. Silly and funny rhyming pairs. I plan to share this with my kindergartners and first graders for rhyming text fun.

Buy here.

Wet by Carey Sookocheff

Wet

Wet by Carey Sookocheff; illustrated by Carey Sookocheff. 2017. Published by Henry Holt & Co.

Brief summary: A young boy shares the many ways to get wet. He first explores the various degrees of wetness at the pool as he gets just his feet wet, halfway in the pool wet, and all the way wet while swimming.  He shares how some objects get wet like the bench in the park  with a new coat of paint. He talks about how sometimes it is fun to get wet like splashing or when it is not fun getting wet  when he cries.

Comments: This is a simple but clever book of explaining the different types of wet. I never really thought of wet like this before reading the book.

Buy here.

The Dog Days of August: New Dog Picture Books by Angela Ferraris

National Dog Day is August 26th. In honor of this special day, I am sharing some of my favorite new dog picture books. Barkus

Barkus  by Patricia Maclachlan; illustrated by Marc Boutavant. 2017. Published by Chronicle Books.

Brief summary: Uncle Everton comes to visit Nicky before traveling around the world. He leaves Barkus, a large brown dog, to Nicky and her family. Barkus follows Nikky to school becoming her class’s dog. Barkus is loved by everyone and has several little adventures including finding a kitten.

Comments: This is a beginner reader with short chapters to help prepare young readers for chapter book reading. Each chapter is a story within itself.  The energy and excitement of having a new pet is shared with the reader. It looks like this may be the first of a series.  The title page and spine did say Book 1. The online description says 56 pages.

Buy here.The Best Days Are Dog Days by Aaron Meshon

The Best Days are Dog Days by Aaron Meshon; illustrated by Aaron Meshon. 2016. Pen & ink, scanner, colored and layered into the final art digitally.

Brief summary: A French bulldog and his sis(human girl) have a fun day together with the help of Mom and Dad. Sis’s life is on the left side of the book with the dog’s on the right.  The story parallels one another in a humorous way.

Comments: A cute story of a dog and his family in which children can see and read the two viewpoints of a canine and human going on an outdoor adventure together.

Buy here.

Douglas, You Need Glasses by Ged Adamson

Douglas, You Need Glasses! by Jed Adamson; illustrated by Jed Adamson. 2016. Pencil and watercolor.

Brief Summary: Douglas(a dog) does not realize he is near-sighted and keeps mistaking objects. His owner takes him to get classes and his world becomes clearer.

Comments: Students will chuckle at Douglas and his visual mistakes.  There is a two page spread of photos in the back of children who actually wear glasses. I will read this book  to my younger students around the time vision is tested.

Buy here.

Hello Goodbye Dog

Hello Goodbye Dog by Maria Gianferrari; illustrated by Patrice Barton. 2017. Published by Roaring Brook Press.

Brief summary: Zara loves her dog, Moose. Moose misses Zara when she goes to school. The dog wants to be with her owner and escapes from the house to be with Zara in her classroom. The dog loves the hellos of seeing Zara, but not the goodbyes when she must leave her human. It takes Mom, Dad, Zara and Mrs. Perkins to get Moose to leave the classroom. Moose soon returns for a big hello as everyone is reading in the library. The entire day is full of hellos and goodbyes for Moose. Zara comes up with a solution, and she and Moose go to therapy dog school where Moose passes all the tests to becomes Zara’s therapy dog. Now, Moose can attend school with Zara all day.

Comments: This is set up as a cumulative story with more and more people taking Moose out of the school. There is an author’s note in the back about library dogs and therapy dogs.  It was refreshing to read a story about a little girl who went to school and who happened to be in a wheelchair.  The story was not focused on her disability.

Buy here. 

treat

Treat by Mary Sullivan; illustrated by Mary Sullivan. 2016. Pencil on Strathmore drawing paper, scanned, and digitally colored.

Brief Summary: Dog wants a treat and looks everywhere for one with great enthusiasm using that one word over and over. Treat? Treat. Treat!

Comment:  I plan to use this with my primary to practice reading with question marks, periods, and exclamation marks. I want them to see how our voices change saying the same word but with different meanings.

Buy here.

(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library).

Hello Goodbye Dog by Maria Gianferrari

Hello Goodbye Dog

Hello Goodbye Dog by Maria Gianferrari; illustrated by Patrice Barton. 2017. Published by Roaring Brook Press.

Brief summary: Zara loves her dog, Moose. Moose misses Zara when she goes to school. The dog wants to be with her owner and escapes from the house to be with Zara in her classroom. The dog loves the hellos of seeing Zara, but not the goodbyes when she must leave her human. It takes Mom, Dad, Zara and Mrs. Perkins to get Moose to leave the classroom. Moose soon returns for a big hello as everyone is reading in the library. The entire day is full of hellos and goodbyes for Moose. Zara comes up with a solution, and she and Moose go to therapy dog school where Moose passes all the tests to becomes Zara’s therapy dog. Now, Moose can attend school with Zara all day.

Comments: This is set up as a cumulative story with more and more people taking Moose out of the school. There is an author’s note in the back about library dogs and therapy dogs.  It was refreshing to read a story about a little girl who went to school and who happened to be in a wheelchair.  The story was not focused on her disability.

Buy here. 

(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library).

Barkus by Patricia Maclachlan

Barkus

Barkus by Patricia Maclachlan; illustrated by Marc Boutavant. 2017. Published by Chronicle Books.

Brief summary: Uncle Everton comes to visit Nicky before traveling around the world. He leaves Barkus, a large brown dog, to Nicky and her family. Barkus follows Nikky to school becoming her class’s dog. Barkus is loved by everyone and has several little adventures including finding a kitten.

Comments: This is a beginner reader with short chapters to help prepare young readers for chapter book reading. Each chapter is a story within itself.  The energy and excitement of having a new pet is shared with the reader. It looks like this may be the first of a series.  The title page and spine did say Book 1. The online description says 56 pages.

Buy here.

(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library)

Bob, Not Bob! by Liz Garton Scanlon and Audrey Vernick

Bob, not Bob!

Bob, Not Bob!: *to be read as though you have the worst cold ever by Liz Garton Scanlon and Audrey Vernick; illustrated by Matthew Cordell. 2017. Hyperion Books(Disney).

Brief summary: Louie gets a cold and wants his mom. “Bob! Bob!” he calls all stuffed up. Instead of his mom, their dog Bob runs into the boy’s room. After many attempts, Louie finally gets the comfort from his mom that he needs.

Comments: Young readers can relate to the way Louie speaks differently with his cold and how frustrated he feels just wanting his mom. If no one notices the spelling differences of Bob, I would point out that out after reading it to a class.  “Did anyone noticed when Louie called for his mom, there was a heart in Bob. B-(heart)-B?” “Did you ever say words differently when you had a cold?”  “Did ever just want your mom?”

I plan to review the Dracula technique of coughing or sneezing after reading this book to my classes and where the tissues and hand sanitizer are located in the library. This could also be read at the beginning of the school year during library orientation or when we go over library rules.

Buy here.

(I may get a commission for purchases made through links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books reviewed were checked out of the public library and not sent to me free for review).

The Best Days Are Dog Days by Aaron Meshon

The Best Days Are Dog Days by Aaron Meshon

The Best Days Are Dog Days by Aaron Meshon; illustrated by Aaron Meshon. 2016. Pen & ink, scanner, colored and layered into the final art digitally.

Brief summary: A French bulldog and his sis(human girl) have a fun day together with the help of Mom and Dad. Sis’s life is on the left side of the book with the dog’s on the right.  The story parallels one another in a humorous way.

Comments: A cute story of a dog and his family in which children can see and read the two viewpoints of a canine and human going on an outdoor adventure together.

Buy here.

Douglas, You Need Glasses by Ged Adamson

Douglas, You Need Glasses by Ged Adamson

Douglas, You need Glasses by Jed Adamson; illustrated by Jed Adamson. 2016. Pencil and watercolor.

Brief Summary: Douglas(a dog) does not realize he is near-sighted and keeps mistaking objects. His owner takes him to get classes and his world becomes clearer.

Comments: Students will chuckle at Douglas and his visual mistakes.  There is a two page spread of photos in the back of children who actually wear glasses. I will read this book  to my younger students around the time vision is tested.

Buy here.

Treat by Mary Sullivan

 

treat

Treat by Mary Sullivan; illustrated by Mary Sullivan. 2016. Pencil on Strathmore drawing paper, scanned, and digitally colored.

Brief Summary: Dog wants a treat and looks everywhere for one with great enthusiasm using that one word over and over. Treat? Treat. Treat!

Comment:  I plan to use this with my primary to practice reading with question marks, periods, and exclamation marks. I want them to see how our voices change saying the same word but with different meanings.

Buy here.