The Last Peach by Gus Gordon; illustrated by Gus Gordon

thelastpeachThe Last Peach by Gus Gordon; illustrated by Gus Gordon. 2019. Published by Roaring Brook Press.

Brief summary: Two bugs are sitting on a leaf in the peach tree admiring the last peach of the year and discuss how they should eat it. Another bug comes along and wonders if the peach is rotten inside. The two continue to discuss the pros and cons of eating the peach and decide it is too beautiful to eat.

Comments: This whimsical book would work well as a reader’s theater selection. Each character has a different colored font to make it easier for young readers to keep track. I like that the end pages have pictures of peaches instead of just plain white paper.

Square by Mac Barnett

SquareSquare by Mac Barnett; illustrated by Jon Klassen; 2018. Digitally and with watercolor and graphite. Published by Candlewick Press.

Brief summary: Square goes into his secret den every day and pushes out a square of rock and piles it with the other squares. One day Circle rolls by and compliments Square for his wonderful sculpture that looks like the artist. Could Square sculpture one of Circle? He works all night in the rain. Will Circle be pleased with his results?

Comments: Second of the shape trilogy of Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen.  Young readers will be amused by the sense of humor in Square as they were in Triangle. The illustrations are blacks, grays, and browns.

The Great Dictionary Caper by Judy Sierra

thegreatdictionarycaperThe Great Dictionary Caper by Judy Sierra; illustrated by Eric Comstock. 2018. Digital. Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary: Grand Marshall, I, tries to get everyone ready for a parade but has trouble with the longest word(see if you can guess what it is), action verbs, no action contractions, homophones, antonyms, palindrome, archaic words, proper nouns, anagrams, interjections, and others to get back into the dictionary with the help of Noah Webster(first dictionary) and Peter Mark Roget(thesaurus).

Comments: Glossary in the back. This actually will be better understood by the older young reader who can understand and is familiar with all the types of word categories. I would share this with third grade on up.

 

Rhyme Crime by Jon Burgerman

Rhyme CrimeRhyme Crime by Jon Burgerman; illustrated by Jon Burgerman. 2018. Published by Dial Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary: Hammy’s hat is stolen and switched for a cat. A mystery shadow hand is seen throughout the book taking and switching it with rhyming items from the many characters in this silly and clever book of rhymes. Who is this mysterious thief? Will the police catch the perpetrator? Where did it all go wrong?

Comments: I can’t wait to share this with primary students when we go back to school. Students will need to think of a rhyming word that could match what was just stolen by the mystery hand. Turn the page to see if they are correct and then get ready for the next character on the right side of the page that gets something stolen.

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Truck Full of Ducks by Ross Burach

Truck Full of Ducks

Truck Full of Ducks by Ross Burach, illustrated by Ross Burach. 2018. Published by Scholastic Press.

Brief summary: The story begins right away on the end pages with ducks sitting, eating, and reading in an office when Bernie receives a phone call for a truck full of ducks. Everyone piles into a truck and is on their way when one of the ducks eats the directions. Bernie drives around town asking people if they called for a truck full of ducks. We hilariously learn about other trucks that are called and finally get to the right address as it starts to get dark.

Comments: Ross Burach’s humor in his books have my students laughing and joking even when I’m finished reading. His light and fast-moving duck story is no different. The story is told using dialogue. “Did you call for a truck full of ducks?”  The two-page spreads are full of silliness with the cartoon illustrations, signs, and speech bubbles.  I can’t wait to share this book next week with my kindergarteners and then share the book trailer below which is narrated by Ross Burach.

Dog on a Frog? by Kes and Claire Gray

Dog on a Frog?

Dog on a Frog? by Kes and Claire Gray; illustrated by Jim Field. 2017. Published by Scholastic Press.

Brief summary: A feisty and bossy frog speaks up and no longer wants dogs to sit on frogs. Dogs will now sit on logs. He tells everyone that they are now going to be sitting on other things that are not the norm anymore and tells them if they do not like it, they will just have to do it.

Comments: Sequel to Frog on a Log?. Silly and funny rhyming pairs. I plan to share this with my kindergartners and first graders for rhyming text fun.

Buy here.

The Wolf, the Duck and the Mouse by Mac Barnett

The Wolf, the Duck, and the Mouse

The Wolf, the Duck & the Mouse by Mac Barnett; illustrated by Jon Klassen. 2017. Mixed media. Published by Candlewick Press.

Brief summary: One morning, a mouse is eaten by wolf and moans about his unexpected end as it sits in the beast’s belly. “Be quiet!” The mouse is surprised to find a duck in bed. They have breakfast together in which the rodent learns all about the duck’s life inside the belly of the wolf. The mouse asks if he can stay too where there is no worry. The duck agrees. They dance about causing the wolf’s tummy to hurt.  The duck suggests he knows how to cure his ache and lists a few supplies he would like the wolf to swallow. A hunter comes along and tries to shoot the wolf. Realizing their safe home is under attack, the goose and mouse come up with a plan scaring the hunter away. In return of saving his life, the wolf grants them a favor.

Comments: Has a fable feel. My favorite line is “I may have been swallowed,” says the duck, “but I have no intention of being eaten.” It made me think of what it would be like to live inside the belly of a beast that I was always being frightened by in my every day life.

Buy here.

 

Baabwaa and Wooliam: A Tale of Literacy, Dental Hygiene, and Friendship by David Elliott

Baabwaa & Wooliam

Baabwaa & Wooliam: A Tale of Literacy, Dental Hygiene, and Friendship by David Elliott; illustrated by Melissa Sweet. 2017. Watercolor, gouache, and mixed media. Published by Candlewick Press.

Brief summary: Wooliam loves to read, and Baabwaa loves to knit. The two sheep enjoy spending the days with their favorite activity until one day, Wooliam suggests that the two friends go on an adventure. They leave their trailer and have a walkabout of the field not going past the stone wall. They are just finishing their lunch of grass when a third sheep approaches with a dirty wool coat. “Run!” said Wooliam. “It’s that Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing I’ve read about.” The wolf chases but then stops, curious about  what they had read about him. The sheep show him the book. After realizing the wolf cannot read, the sheep decide to teach him how to read and knit him a new coat. No good deed goes unpunished, but the three do arrive to harmony.

Comments: These two sheep decide to be kind and understanding to someone even though he has the reputation of eating them, has awful teeth,  and is constantly chasing them around the field. A different viewpoint of the Big Bad Wolf.

Buy here.

Comment Guidelines

I have the comment moderation turned on. Your comment will appear after it has been approved. Keep in mind that young readers may be reading about a picture book I reviewed, so I will not approve your comment if there is inappropriate language. Be kind; be polite. Think before you speak. No spam or ads. Because I am working as a library media specialist, it may take me a day to get back to my blog.

If you see that I made a typo or grammar error, please politely let me know. No need to be snarky. I  am fully aware that I have an attention span of a hummingbird and miss things when I proofread. 

Caring for Your Lion by Tammi Sauer

Caring For Your Lion

Caring for Your Lion by Tammi Sauer; illustrated by Troy Cummings. 2017. Artworks was created digitally.  Published by Sterling Children’s Books.

Brief summary: A boy has been waiting for almost a month for his new kitty to arrive. He has all of the pet supplies ready. The pet delivery truck arrives with a giant wooden crate with a note on it. “Congratulations on your new lion! We know you ordered a kitten, but we ran out of those.” There is an instruction sheet of ludicrous fourteen steps to follow.

Comments: Be sure to look the front end pages where the story begins. Troy Cummings’ hilarious 50s/60s cartoon style brings the story alive with one humorous step to the next. I would use this book as a writing exercise. Students could think of a wild animal that they would receive in the mail and what steps they would need to take to care for it. Drawings could be included.

Buy here.

Second Grade Holdout by Audrey Vernick

Second Grade Holdout

Second Grade Holdout by Audrey Vernick; illustrated by Matthew Cordell. 2017. Pen and ink with watercolor. Published by Clarion Books.

Brief summary: A boy going into second grade remembers all of the wonderful things he did and accomplished in first grade. He worries that second grade will have difficult tasks, and he may not be the good student his dad wants him to be.  He decides he’ll just stay in Ms. Morgan’s first grade class and comes up with all the reasons why that will be a good idea. He agonizes about going to second grade after hearing that second grade is much harder than first grade.  After realizing that his best friend’s sisters are kidding about what second grade is like, he and his buddy go to school.

Comments: Students will find the boy’s reasons of not going to second grade humorous.  I like how he is able to figure out that his best friend’s older sisters are kidding and teasing them about being worried about going into second grade. They actually help him realize that it is going to be okay knowing that not all of the rumors are not true about second grade.

Buy here.

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