Nothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain by Cheryl Bardoe

Nothing Stopped SophieNothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain by Cheryl Bardoe; illustrated by Barbara McClintock. 2018. Pen-and-ink, watercolor, and collage. Published by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary: Sophie lived during the French Revolution in Paris.  During this turbulent time in history, Sophie was interested in math. Her family tried to get her to stop studying at night by taking away her candles, fires, and warm dresses to keep her in her bed and not calculating complex math problems.  By age 19, she wanted to go to a university to study math, but that was unheard of for a woman to do that. She was able to get notes from math classes and turned in assignments signing them “Monsieur LeBlanc”.  A professor came to her house and discovered she was the student. She met several scholars and was quietly becoming known. Her most famous math contribution was when she was able to find a mathematical formula that would predict vibration patterns. The Academy of Sciences had a math contest that had a prize of 3,000 francs. Sophie applied had the wrong solution. She kept testing and experimenting until 1826 when she found the answer to the problem and won.

Comments: Sections in the back are: short bio sketch, Is this Math or Science? Discover the Effects of Vibration for Yourself, Notes from the author and illustrator, and a bibliography.

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The Book About Nothing by Mike Bender

The Book About NothingThe Book About Nothing by Mike Bender; illustrated Hugh Murphy. 2018. Published by Crown Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary:  Bird tells how the book is about nothing and gives many examples of nothing and what it is.

Comments: Good book for teaching zero to young readers. End pages are full of words that mean nothing like null, zippo, zilch and so on.

(I have the comment moderation turned on. Your comment will appear after it has been approved. Keep in mind that young readers may be reading the picture book I reviewed, so I will not approve your comment if there is inappropriate language. Be kind; be polite. No spam or ads, please. Because I am working as a library media specialist, it may take me a day to get back to my blog.

If you see that I made a typo or grammatical error, I’m totally cool with you politely letting me know. No need to be snarky. I am fully aware that I have an attention span of a hummingbird and miss things when I proofread. I also realize that I am not a professional writer, but I am willing to learn and improve).

7 Ate 9 by Tara Lazar

Seven at nine

7 Ate 9: The Untold Story by Tara Lazar; illustrated by Ross MacDonald. 2017. Colored pencils, watercolor, and 19th-century wood type with all composed digitally using Photoshop. Published by Disney Hyperion.

Brief summary: Detective  I is waiting for his next case when 6 comes into his office nervously explaining he is worried about 9 going after him.  I takes the case and goes around town asking letters and numbers about 9. The case is solved by Detective I with all becoming friends at the conclusion.

Comments: Based on the old riddle: Why is 6 afraid of 7? Because 7, 8, 9(seven ate nine). Hilarious puns about numbers and letters. A great book to read to all ages especially though to intermediate students who will get all the jokes and homonyms. Told in the first person narrative mode like an old detective movie. This is one of my new favorites.

This may be confused with an earlier book with a similar title: Seven Ate Nine (2012) by Stan Resnicoff.

***Corrected from earlier post. The author is actually Tara Lazar and not Ross MacDonald.

Buy here. 

(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library).