Read! Read! Read! by Amy Ludwig Vanderwater

Read! Read! Read!

Read! Read! Read! by Amy Ludwig Vanderwater; illustrated by Ryan O’Rourke. 2017. Created in Adobe Photoshop. Published by Word Song: An Imprint of Highlights.

Brief summary: Twenty-three rhyming poems sharing the various ways and places we read in our lives.

Comments: Loved this book!  The poetry has rhythm and rhyme. Some are short; some are longer. The author wrote a poem each of the many things we read in our every day lives: a magazine, a birthday card,  a cereal box, sports page, road signs and so on. The illustrations fill the pages with several two page spreads.

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My Daddy Rules the World: Poems About Dads by Hope Anita Smith

My Daddy Rules the World

My Daddy Rules the World: Poems About Dads by Hope Anita Smith; illustrated by Hope Anita Smith. 2017. Torn paper. Published by Henry Holt and Company.

Brief summary: Fifteen poems with full-page illustrations all in the voice and viewpoint of the son or daughter.

Comments: Illustrations are created with torn paper. The faces are without features. I liked all of the different roles that a father had in this book. Students and children will be able to relate to the subject matter. Multicultural.

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(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library).

A New School Year: Stories in Six Voices by Sally Derby

A New School Year

A New School Year: Stories in Six Voices by Sally Derby; illustrated by Mika Song. 2017. Watercolor and sumi ink with brush on Saunders Waterford watercolor paper. Published by Charlesbridge.

Brief summary: This book of free verse poetry is divided into four sections of the first day of school: The Night Before, In the Morning, At School, and After School. The six voices are poetry by elementary students in K-5 grades.  There are twenty-four poems all together.

Comments: This book would be great to read on the first day of school so students would see that other children are feeling the same way they are on that important day. The different perspectives could be enlightening for young readers. The teacher could decide to read all of the poems throughout the day or just go through and read in one sharing the ones matching his/her grade level. This also could be used to have students share their feelings about the first day of school.

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(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library).

Make the Earth Your Companion by J. Patrick Lewis

Make the Earth Your Companion

Make the Earth Your Companion by J. Patrick Lewis; illustrated by Anna and Elena Balbusso. 2017. Published by Creative Editions.

Brief summary:  A gentle poem advises the reader how earth elements can teach about life; how nature can teach mankind to live in harmony with life and one another. “Let the River remind you that everything will pass.”

Comments: One of my new favorite poems of J. Patrick Lewis. The rhythm of the poem and softness of the words with the beautiful illustrations of the Balbusso sisters  are both aesthetically pleasing to hear and see.  This would be an excellent addition to any library. I would use it in the school setting for Earth Day and to teach imagery.  Very well done.

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(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library.)

Thunder Underground by Jane Yolen

Thunder Underground

Thunder Underground by Jane Yolen; illustrated by Josee Masse. 2017. Mixed media. Published by WordSong.

Brief summary: This collection of short poems about various things are all about what can be found underground or live in the ground. A boy and girl move through the book exploring the poetry’s topic. Some of these things are man-made or are in Nature. Examples are animal homes, magma, caves, ancient cities, fossils, and many more interesting subjects.  Past and present are discussed.

Comments: Full paged illustrations with rhyming words. Notes are in the back on the topic of each poem. Students will want to learn more about the poem’s topic. I can see this being paired with nonfiction books or even research on the internet. I think this book will expose students to things under the ground they may not be aware of in everyday life. I consider this a  book of wonder that could develop curiosity in students to seek more information.

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(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library.)

Tony by Ed Galing

Tony

Tony by Ed Galing; illustrated by Erin E. Stead. 2017. Gomuban monoprinting and pencil. Published by Roaring Brook Press.

Brief summary: In Ed Galing’s poem, a boy tells all about Tony, a gentle white horse he sees each morning during a time when dairy products were delivered to one’s door.

Comments:  I imagined this little boy waking up each school day and seeing and hearing Tony walking through the neighborhood. This short and gentle poem is illustrated with soft pencils. There are shadings of grays and greens with yellow colors added towards the end of the book representing dawn.  Illustrator Erin E. Stead did a superb job of creating the illustrations with the same spirit and touching gentleness of the poem. This is a beautiful tribute to a neighborhood working horse. One can imagine how seeing this equine friend every morning impacted the child.

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(I may get a commission for purchases made through links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books reviewed were checked out of the public library and not sent to me free for review).