Hey, Water by Antoinette Portis; illustrated by Antoinette Portis

Hey, water.jpgHey, Water by Antoinette Portis; illustrated by Antoinette Portis. 2019. Brush and sumi ink; digitally colored. Published by Neal Porter Books.

Brief summary: A girl shares all about the water that is around her and how it is not always the same in the way it looks or feels.

Comments: This would be a good, simple book to read when doing the water cycle in primary grades. All three water forms are examined with a more detailed section of  “Water Forms” in the back pages. A  diagram of the water cycle and a “Conserving Water” section are included.

I think by reading this as an introduction to the water cycle would help the students see the three forms of water in their world by how the young girl examines them in the book.

Ice Boy by David Ezra Stein

Ice Boy

Ice Boy by David Ezra Stein; illustrated by David Ezra Stein. 2017. Mixed media on watercolor paper. Published by Candlewick Press.

Brief summary: Ice Boy has a normal ice cube life in the freezer with his family and friends. Sometimes, someone goes to a person’s drink which is considered an honor. Although his parents warn him not to go outside, he leaves the freezer. Ice Boy goes to the beach and even surfs on the waves. He sinks to the bottom of the ocean becoming Water Boy. He is later knocked out of the sea landing on someone’s beach towel becoming vapor in the hot sun. Vapor Boy plays in the clouds until he becomes Ice Boy again falling to the earth and landing in someone’s drink where he meets his parents. The person throws them into the yard leaving the reader with the hint of what will happen next.

Comments: What a fun and imaginative way to explain the water cycle!  Teachers will love to use this book paired with a nonfiction water cycle book. There are many laugh-out-loud situations. This is a good edition to any elementary library.

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Watersong by Tim McCanna

Watersong

Watersong by Tim McCanna; illustrated by Richard Smythe. 2017. Watercolors and finished digitally. Published by Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers.

Brief summary:  A fox goes into a watershed to catch a duck but misses and gets caught in a stream that throws him out when he falls over a waterfall to a forest below. He takes shelter in a fallen tree during a rain shower until it clears. He sees his mate under a rainbow, and they dance as he is reunited with his family on the return of a hunt.

Comments: This book’s beautiful full-paged watercolors illustrations compliment the gentle rhyming of the water. Clever rhyming with onomatopoeia  water sounds. There is a section called Listen to the Watersong explaining the ecosystem of a watershed.

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(I may receive a small commission for purchases made with links in this post through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Books in this picture book blog are not sent to me in exchange for a review, but instead, are checked out from a public library.)

The Water Princess by Susan Verde

The Water Princess by Susan Verde

The Water Princess by Susan Verde; illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds. 2016. Watercolor gouache, digital inks.

Brief summary: Gie Gie wakes before dawn by her mother to make the long journey to get water from the river. Gie Gie puts her empty pot on her head and sings along with her mother during their water journey stopping midway to rest under a karite tree and eat some of the shea nuts for energy. They reach the river where they talk and play with other women and girls while waiting in line for their turn to fill the pots. The sun begins to set as they return home where Maman must boil the water first for drinking. They wash clothes and prepare food when Father comes in from the fields. He picks her up and says, “My princess,  you have returned with the water.”

Comments:  The story is based on the high fashion African model Georgia Badiel’s summers as a girl in Burkina Faso where she gathered water by walking on a four mile journey with other women and girls in the village. Georgia Badiel created a foundation along with Ryan’s Well to focus on bringing clean water to villages by building wells. Girls do not get to go to school, because they must spend all day getting water for their families.  This book would be a great lesson to teach our children of how precious water is and to not take it for granted. It may make them appreciate how easily we can get ours by simply turning  a knob. I see this book as a Coretta Scott King Book Award contender.